When Making New Year's Resolutions, It's All About the Timing

(CC) EEPaul/Flickr In the days after Christmas leading up to the New Year, many will spend hours pondering and fantasizing about the many ways their lives will be different in 2014 -- the changes they'll make, small and big, that will lead them to having a successful year. However, our timing when making these resolutions might be the reason why most of us can't even remember what we've resolved to do by the time December roles around. Instead, wait until February 1st to make your resolutions.

The problem with making resolution on January 1st, as clinical psychologist Ramani Durvasula explains, is it follows a month that is hectic and takes people out of their normal routines. She suggests instead to make resolutions on February 1st, when you've had a chance to get back into the swing of your normal life. Then, check your progress on those resolutions every month.

When you try to make a resolution on January 1st and add something new to your routine, you're just setting yourself up for failure. After the hectic holiday season, it's already difficult to return to your regular routine. When you try to make changes to that routine, it just makes things that much more difficult.

So, if you really want to stick to your New Year's resolutions, give yourself a few weeks to get back into the swing of things. And, don't worry -- this is not an incident that will be added to your on-going procrastination report.