Could You Get Used to a 6-Hour Workday?

It's no surprise that many of us work more than eight hours every day. There are deadlines to be met, meetings to attend, and projects to finish up. But sometimes, we must analyze the hours that we work. Are we really being as productive as possible during these long, strenuous days?

According to recent study, there is a push for returning to six-hour workdays. This push comes from the fact that productivity is higher during a certain six-hour period (depending on when you sleep) than in the other hours, thus making  those six hours more valuable than the rest.

Employers need to be cognizant of the benefits of these six hours, and schedule workers accordingly. A shorter workday is especially beneficial for those who work in the creative or knowledge fields, as their brains spew forth the best work in a short period. Late mornings and periods in the afternoon can offer these especially productive times, where the mind is firing on all cylinders. The rest of the time can essentially be deleted from the work day, making business save on paid salaries and lost time with employees.

In order to be as productive as possible, monitor your times of heightened performance. Shift your schedule around this time to allow for optimal progress, and if possible, eliminate working during periods of time where your productivity is low. With this strategy, you will get the most out of your workday, and even more out of your free time!

© fotomatrix - Fotolia
© fotomatrix - Fotolia

Marissa Brassfield

Marissa Brassfield is a productivity expert, branding consultant and communication efficiency specialist who helps entrepreneurs and high-performance teams become ridiculously efficient.

Marissa has worked with some of the most visionary entrepreneurs on the planet. She’s dialed in to the frustrations these results-oriented, interrupt-driven individuals have with bureaucracy and suboptimal team performance. Her coaching helps entrepreneurs counteract growth-killing practices and unlock unparalleled performance from their support staff.