6 Ways to Avoid the Afternoon Slump

When do you have the most energy during the day? When are you the most productive?

Many people face an energy slump around 3pm in the afternoon. You have worked hard all day, ate a good lunch, and now your productivity seems to be decreasing by the minute. We have all faced this issue. The good news is Fast Company has recommended 6 tips to help you avoid that slump.

  1. Get moving:When you feel tired, the last thing you probably want to do is go for a walk or move around, but getting the blood flowing can actually boost your energy.
  2. Do easy tasks:Plan out your day so your most difficult or energy-consuming tasks are done when you have the most energy, saving the easier tasks for that slump period.
  3. Play a tune: Play some music that will get you refocused and get your head back in the game. Music has been shown to release dopamine, which stimulates motivation and focus. So whether you decide to play your favorite song or add in some white noise, music can do some good.
  4. Drink water: Make sure you are hydrated. If you have been working hard all day, the last thing you are probably thinking about is your hydration. It has been shown that a glass of water will actually give you more energy than a quick dose of sugar, which can actually put you into an even worse slump.
  5. Lighten up your lunch: What you eat at lunch will determine the amount of fuel you have for the rest of the day. If you eat a lunch composed of heavy carbs and fatty foods, your body is going to be working to digest that food instead of giving you the energy your brain needs to keep going. Instead of a heavy pasta dish, try a wrap or a salad – anything with a more equal balance of protein and whole grains.
  6. Take your work elsewhere: Not all of you may have this luxury, but if you do, I highly consider you to try it. Changing your scenery can drastically change your mood and focus. Having different work zones for different tasks can trigger your brain and your focus -- as soon as you enter the next area your brain is prepared for exactly what needs to happen in that space.

I urge you to try one or more of these tasks and see how it changes the part of your day when you are lacking energy. But before you do, try mapping out what a normal day looks like for you. When do you have to be the most alert? When are you the most productive? What are your most challenging tasks? What are the tasks that require the most brain power and energy? When you begin to get a very clear picture about these things as a whole, you can better focus your energy to become the most efficient and effective.